ShShares NETWORK

Week 2 Questions & Discussion

Viewing 31 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #2150

      ***What stood out for you most in this week’s reading?***

      1. Post a 150+ word Weekly Reading Summary
      2. Post a 50+ word reply to 2 other learners
      3. Post all of your questions and answers here regarding the reading material for the week.
    • #6875

      KaMyka Glenn
      Participant

      What stood out to me the most was how much Jesus grooming his disciples is connected to coaching and the approach in which he used was nurturing but teachable at the same time. He built trust, was a role model, modeled how to do things, observed progress, corrected misunderstandings, encouraged them to explore on their own. He also gave feedback, reevaluated, encouraged, and redirected when necessary. This is much like the role of a teacher in many cases, so I can relate to this model very well and will make sure that I use it as my model for coaching. From the reading I realized that coaches do a lot of walking, building, stimulating, facilitating, enabling, improving, and speaking into our clients; which goes with a quote from the readings as well—God knows our failures and in spite of them “he still believes in our potential and never gives up on us.” POWERFUL! Reflecting on this statement I realize that this is how I am with my students, other youth that I connect with, and even people in general. For some reason, I am able to see past the right now and see the potential in them which creates a never give up mentality in me regardless of how challenging the situation may be.

      • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by KaMyka Glenn.
      • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by KaMyka Glenn.
    • #6883

      KaMyka Glenn
      Participant

      Also in the second chapter (ch 5) outlined for reading, I liked the perspective that it gave regarding the role of a coach even if you disagreeing with something the client has said or done, which is to show love, respect, and guidance without judgement just as Jesus did with the woman at the well. This is a great way to keep things in perspective through the process of coaching and to remember because you won’t agree with everything that your clients say or do, however, THEY STILL NEED TO BE COACH WITH LOVE AND RESPECT.  I also appreciated the information provided to help get the initial session started such as questions to ask in order to build trust and rapport, welcome packet and what to include, etc. I will definitely use this as I begin to develop the business side of my coaching business.

      • #6886

        KaMeka,

        I absolutely loved the illustration that they made concerning Jesus and his disciples.  I honestly never looked at Jesus as a ‘coach’ until reading this book.  No one knows us better than our creator…He knows us better than we know ourselves…He knows our strengths, our weaknesses, our shortcomings, our failures and our thoughts from afar off…He’s with us when we’re on the right path, and He’s right there lovingly nudging us back when we’ve drifted off…and not because we’re all that we should be, but because He has invested so much in us and He sees our potential!!!  (don’t start nothing on this forum)

        • #6887

          I apologize for misspelling your name…I have it in my phone the right way!!! 🙂

          • #6889

            KaMyka Glenn
            Participant

            Na’khia,

            It’s okay regarding the spelling.

            I too, did not look at Jesus as a coach but I have always admired his treatment of others regardless of how they treated him, who they were, or the mistakes they made. It’s great to have someone that doesn’t judges you even when they are completely in the know of all your dirty laundry. Unconditional love and support is always a blessing.

          • #6893

            Luberta Lytle
            Participant

            KaMyka,

            I agree with you. The book is very clear regarding how God looks and feels about his people.  It is sad that Christians will stand on his holy word, but quick to judge our fellow human beings. Maybe if we took the time to give people a second chance and give them the benefit of the doubt our society would be a lot better.

    • #6885

      This week’s reading was very insightful for me.  One thing that really stood out to me was the fact that there are many areas in which coaches coach.  I don’t know what made me initially think that I would have to coach everyone who sought my services.  Just as teachers, doctors and other professionals have specialty areas that they work in, the same applies in coaching.  I feel that this was very good for me to read and become aware of because I initially thought I have to build my clientele, and yes that is true, but I must as Marshall Goldsmith said do everything related to my mission.  Not only will that allow you to grow and perfect your craft, but it will also prevent burnout.  Since reading this week’s reading, I’ve mentioned many times to different people the illustration that was used in the book taken from Exodus 18 when Jethro, the father in law of Moses gave him some advice about taking it easy.  This definitely made me realize the importance of having people in my circle who will tell me when enough is enough.

      Another thing that stood out to me was the quote on page 38 by Daniel Harvey…he said “all good coaches believe in a few essential truths, convictions for which they will fight.  leaders with clear convictions find it easier to make decisions.  convictions increase confidence and improve decision-making ability”.  After reading that, I wrote in my journal the question WHAT ARE YOU WILLING TO FIGHT FOR??? (I didn’t answer it yet…not because I don’t know…but because I want to be able to articulate it just like I feel it)  I want my clients to know and understand that change is able and the process will be successful when they know what it is they are willing to fight for…and with the leading, guiding and direction of the Lord, anything is possible.

      Not too much really stood out to me in chapter 5, however I will say this, just as in any relationship, counseling, coaching, etc., you MUST build rapport with the client or else it will not work.  It is important to build a good rapport or the client can potentially build walls of resistance which will definitely hinder the process

      • #7414

        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I totally agree it is imperative to build a rapport with your clients as with any relationship it is essential to have that trust factor. It allows your client to be able to be open and speak freely. I remember a time when I was much younger, unless I knew you on a personal level, I had no conversation with you let along trusting anyone. As I grew older, I begin to communicate more openly with people and began to feel more relaxed when communicating with others. I can hardly believe it myself but if you weren’t in my circle I wouldn’t speak at all. I realize now, as a coach I will be able to aide in making those introverts feel comfortable because that was once me.

    • #6888

      Same here, ladies!  I didn’t think of Jesus as a ‘coach’ either until reading our text.

      I really appreciated how ch. 5 of the book seemed to dig more into the ‘how to’ or should I the ‘nitty – gritty’ of opening the discussion to talk with a client.  I honestly didn’t have a clue on how to even START the conversation other than what I have seen on TV.. .”so tell me ..what brings you here today?   …. and, how does that make you feel?”  🙂

      I’m glad to now have some ‘go to’ questions and also a guideline on how to evaluate the perspective client within the first visit.

      • #6890

        KaMyka Glenn
        Participant

        Na’khia,

        I am a firm believer in building rapport because it is what sustains any kind of relationship. and it’s not build a rapport to see what they can do for you but it’s simply to get to know you, make a connection, and be there. When you build rapport, it breaks down barriers and makes things so much easier.

        • #6892

          Kimberly,

          I also appreciated the list of go to questions as well, and how to go into the session.  I’m so cautious not to lead in like its a counseling session, although some of the questions given were some that I’ve used for counseling session.  But it is good to have some extras in my ‘toolbox’ as well as the first session evaluation

        • #6894

          Luberta Lytle
          Participant

          Kim,
          I am glad that we have a how to guideline for how we should start the session. It gives me a clear understanding on how to start this process and I see that my approach was completely wrong. I am really glad that this information was revealed in the early stages of this class. This information will be beneficial to us all when we start building our coaching business.

      • #6891

        KaMyka Glenn
        Participant

        Kim, I also appreciated the how to guidelines to start because it makes it easier and gives you a starting point for those who are embarking on the business of coaching. The resources mentioned are very helpful and the great things is that you can build off of or modify them to fit your needs.

    • #6910

      Meochia Clayton
      Participant

      What stood out most in this Chapter is based on some of the questions I asked of myself as I was reading it.  Will I be able to detect from parents that they need assistance, resources or that they simply need to talk with someone that understands their situation?  Will I sense this based on my past experiences?  Will this come with time? or Will this come naturally?  I would love to think that the latter is true, that I have an innate ability to be an effective Special Needs Family Coach, but it doesn’t always happen in that manner.

    • #6911

      Meochia Clayton
      Participant

      I appreciated as well as received a boost of confidence when the author stated that you don’t need lots of techniques or years of experience to be an effective life coach.  What contributes to people most is your level of commitment to them.  I am at a point in life that I know how I want to serve in the next stage of my life.  I worked a job for soon to be 20 years that I am not very passionate about (was in the very beginning before I realized what I wanted to do with my life).  Once I leave that I position, I only want to work in areas where I provide an impact.  I know where I am most committed  and as the author stated all of can learn to be effective, so that’s what I am working on now, being effective.

      • #6976

        Re-reading the comments are a great refresher for all of the material we covered so far.  Coach Meosha, your reminder from the reading that it doesn’t take years of experience of lots of techniques to be effective was very encouraging.  It truly is our level of commitment to the client and our authenticity that will motivate and cultivate the people that cross our paths.  Thank you for that statement.

      • #7415

        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Coach Clayton, Boost of confidence is exactly what I felt in this chapter. I agree with you about going forth and working this next season of life in your passion. My passion is and has always been to serve people in all walks of life. It definitely doesn’t matter what walk of life one comes from, we all need to be a present help. As stated it takes commitment.

    • #7131

      Anonymous
      Inactive

      While reading “What makes a good coach?” I was relieved to find that being a coach is just being yourself but, with a little more experience in the areas of life that you have overcome. It also helped me to know that coaching can help me to become a good clinical psychologist. With the techniques of coaching, since I am currently working on my BA in psychology, I was wondering how to make them work together and separately. Sometimes people just need a listening ear and the opportunity to hear themselves speak some things out loud, and they just may hear a solution as they vent or talk. People that are trying to start a business sometime just need someone to listen to them talk it out, to believe in them, and make them feel like they can do it, and that’s where we come in. In this business or this ministry of Life Coaching you can’t afford not be able to relate to others.

      • #7133

        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I do believe Shonnika that you will be good at both because I see your passion for helping others. But I can relate with questioning myself to what would make me ‘stand out’ as a coach… Not just having the good characteristics but how can I use my own personality to attract and serve the right clients. But I love how you mentioned its just about being yourself:-)

    • #7132

      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I love to read, I love to learn, I love to find new ways to view things…most of all I love how the word of God has everything to do with who we are and should be!

      I’m so glad to be embarking on this journey!

      Learning how to effectively help people with their personal endeavors and/or with business ventures, or just to be that person that can help remind someone, “yes you can” but, the best thing about this journey (this course) to me is that, it betters us in the process as coaches.

      • #7135

        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I definitely agree with you there Shonnika! I believe the world will be a better place because of the passion I see exemplified in you ladies and your willingness to commit to the learning process. I am so proud to be a part of this particular group!

    • #7134

      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I enjoyed this week’s reading especially when it outlined that christian coaching is not just about who you are and who you are becoming but “who we are as a follower of Jesus Christ.” For me this is a big thing because I don’t want to do anything that’s not helping me become a better Christian and fulfill my purpose in this world. I also loved the fact that it seem that it was describing me (big smile).. meaning I am a natural leader, action and future oriented, believing in people and helping them achieve their goals. What I can say is, I’ve learnt that we should always be improving on our strengths as it helps to build our confidence also. So even as a Coach, I am signing up as a continuous learner.

       

       

    • #7136

      Anonymous
      Inactive

      After reading chapter 6, I found it very interesting that one of the distraction was “thinking of the next question” which is something I found myself doing previously. How difficult has it been incorporating the feedback and lessons learned into your coaching sessions without coming across robotic?

    • #7214

      Mojo81
      Participant

      What makes a good coach?

      Its a complicated question within itself. What exactly makes one good, when what they do is effective? I believe what determines if a coach is going in a right direction is when the change begins within. As you grow to know yourself more you begin to become a better coach to your clients. You have to find you to become a better you as a coach. As a Christian coach, your relationship with God plays a vital factor on the relationships you have with your clients. Long story short you technically become your first client. How is your commitment with your own goals? How is your commitment and follow through with your daily tasks? This was a challenge for me on both sides. It made me check the areas I actually struggled in as an individual and even more so as a coach it motivated to be committed to following through with what I started. Did I get it on one setting, no. However, the discipline required and demanded small changes and in those changes I celebrated and motivated myself to keep pushing as I would a client. So a good coach is a coach who refuses to allow their clients quit, by informing them there is a process you must respect and even if you don’t get it the first time celebrate the increase no matter the size. I found that being a quality coach shows that you are sure of yourself while being flexible in that reality when it counts. Many coaches have their own strengths and though they may mirror other coaches, they as an individual know what makes them unique and that is where quality coaches stand out. Quality Christian Coaches learn to see people the way God sees them.

      Change

      Change is necessary. I believe coaches are there to help clients sort through the garbage and the recyclables in their lives. Garbage are those things we may call distractions, bad habits, negative perspectives, people of hindrance toward betterment. While recyclables are those thing that don’t rot and can be used over and over again. In change this is a factor that either encourages it or hinders it. When we realize those things that work for us and separate them from the things that hinders us, our view becomes clearer and change becomes obvious. In change we must not forget to celebrate improvements no matter the sizes. Cheerleading is always a plus, even if it comes from yourself. When changes occur, we must solidify our reason to do. That is done differently by everyone, but must take place by the individual in a willingly way. This avoids the possibility of the blame game and regrets. After establishing a change is needed, you must look for the resources to encourage your desired outcome. Once you have an idea of what you want from the change, you must then determine how you plan on doing it. Keeping your plan realistic and related to your desire. Taking steps toward it is just as important as the ultimate goal. each step needing a celebration size appropriate to motivate toward the final goal. Changes forces discomfort and that is normal. It is not always easily digested . While some change may be like baby food or a liquid diet, easy to consume without chewing. Other changes, primarily the ones that pulls you from your familiar and comfort zones, requires you to chew, like most table food or even more so like a tough steak. The important part is that they both offer nutrients to help you grow. Change should encourage growth. Like with women clipping their split ends, cutting off the bad should encourage the new, as well as positive growth.

    • #7413

      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Week 2 discussion provided what makes a good coach. This week’s reading was enlightening as it confirms the character of a good coach. It was affirmed to study the sensitivity of being an effective coach. Effective coaches must be flexible for they are change makers. Effective coaches know themselves and are aware of their strengths and weakness. The skills of making an effective Christian Coach was also explained in lesson 2. More importantly, it is imperative to have a developed relationship with Christ. I read that coaches enable individuals and groups to move from where they are to their destiny by just being. Good coaches have the ability to listen attentively and respectfully. Coaching is about moving forward and aiding your clients to do the same. Coaches’ aide clients are to raise awareness of their values and beliefs. Coaches guide Christians on their journey and pursuing their purpose in life. Clients must be able to trust their coach. Trusting their coach allows them to be open in discussion. Coaches are facilitators. This session also discussed the importance of facilitating change. We are to encourage guide and walk with those that want change. We discussed the resistance of change. Many resist change because of the unknown. We are change agents and are to facilitate to our clients in a way that they understand and trust the coach to facilitate that change.

    • #7642

      Elizabeth Howze
      Participant

      <p class=”MsoNormal” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; color: #000000;”>My favorite section of the reading this week was found in Chapter 3 where Dr. Collins discusses how coaching and leadership walk hand-in-hand. Specifically, I found his reflection of Jethro and Moses extremely enlightening as I had never thought about Jethro being a coach to Moses (pg. 40)! Rather than criticize or condemn the inefficiency of the system Moses was using, Jethro: 1. Observed Moses’ performance, 2. Made observations, 3.  Provided options that gave a vision for something better, 4. Helped Moses clear some of the obstacles consuming his life.  By operating this way, Jethro positioned himself as a maestro instead of a master and a coach instead of a commander. Often times, when I am frustrated with inefficient systems (and the baggage that comes with them), I find myself operating in ways that are dominating to others because I believe I have the collective best interest in mind. However, this particular section of the reading gave me a new framework to operate from and tips on how to lead (and serve) in ways that considers the nuances of personalities while also stimulating awareness, responsibility, and change.</p>

    • #7647

      Latoya Brown
      Participant

       

      In this week’s reading  I learned  about being a good coach. I learned coaching is leadership. I am leader at my current employer and I never looked at it as coaching until reading this book. I always tell my employees that I am here to push them to their maximum potential personally and professionally. WOW!! I have been coaching for years and did not realize it. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span>In chapter 5 Collins talked about building relationships and how Important they are as you will have to gain trust of your clients as well build expectations and boundaries. It will also to prevent any miscommunication or understanding. I will work on forms for my clients to complete before first meeting and also outline what coaching is and what our sessions would look like. This chapter was very informative and provide some great tools and techniques to use as a business owner. Both chapters go hand in hand as being a good coach you have to build relationships with your clients. build trust to and respect and help the client to move from one point to on to the next. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span>

       

    • #7648

      Latoya Brown
      Participant

      <span style=”display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: #ffffff; color: #333333; font-family: Georgia,’Times New Roman’,’Bitstream Charter’,Times,serif; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;”>Liz I agree I did not look at from that angle. we often cause our own frustrations by not taking in the suggestions or even direction from others. I know I am guilty of that! that alone could affect some of your relationships. this reading has definitely opened my eyes as well as made me aware of some changes I could make. </span><b></b><i></i><u></u><span style=”text-decoration: line-through;”></span>

    • #7658

      Latasha Lunford
      Participant

      This week’s reading was very powerful! “What Makes a Good Coach?” This is a question that I asked myself many times before enrolling into this course. I could not respond to this question adequately. When I presented others with the knowledge that I was on a journey to become a life coach, they immediately judged me from my past experiences and reactions. Their responses were so opinionated, negative, and unkind. I wanted to quit before I even started the class. I thought that I would have to change myself and become an entirely different person in just 2 months. HOWEVER, I have learned from this week’s readings, that I may not appear to have all of the skills or qualities of a successful life coach now but I DO have the ability to be trained, coached, and increase my skills to become a great one. No, I did not go to college for psychology or psychiatry, but I feel I have great people skills. I can relate to and connect with many people on many different levels. According to this week’s readings, Coaches must  show respect and genuine interest toward others and participate in active listening. I had an epiphany, I already HAVE those skills! As an educator of 10 years, I have to have the skills above in order to effectively teach elementary age children.  The adults in my inner circle have not seen that side of me, as of yet. I have to learn how to transfer my qualifying skills from the little people world to the big people world. lol! They will see that they were wrong when they see my results!

    • #7659

      Hope L Brown
      Participant

      <p class=”MsoNormal”><span style=”font-size: 12.0pt; line-height: 115%; font-family: ‘Times New Roman’,’serif’;”>This week reading was very enlightening in this reading I gain clarity. What makes a good coach? Coaching is about a journey along with other people that are eager to learn, highly motivated to win, and to have somebody to believe in them. Good coaches are eager to learn about all the techniques the make them a good coach. When I read that I was like Yes! That is so me, but then I kept reading and found out you will learn a lot of techniques while learning and experience. I quickly learned that you have a commitment to the people. Coaching is not something you study to become it’s something you are developed and shape on your journey of Coaching. Coaches learn to become good coaches while learning to be a good coach we are also becoming better people. I also learned that a coach will know they are being effective when they begin to become more aware of who they are the coach becomes aware of their strength and weakness. Great coaches are aware of their core values and belief. My favorite take away from the reading is becoming a good coach to reveal your weakness which will allow you to begin to see yourself more clearly.</span></p>

    • #7660

      Hope L Brown
      Participant

      <p class=”MsoNormal”>I agree with Latasha it was a very powerful enlighten reading I thought coaching was something totally different. I was under the impression that coaching was like counseling but I have learned it’s more like turning on the light in a dark room so the individual can decide which way they would like to go</p>

    • #7661

      Hope L Brown
      Participant

      <p class=”MsoNormal”>WOW! Liz and Latoya that is a good insight on what you received for the reading. Liz, I too found out that there are many coaches in the bible. When Jesus ask peter to come Peter came but begin to lose the way Jesus rescued him and ask “why did you doubt” which got peter to reflecting on why. Latoya that’s the part I enjoyed to know that building relationship are a great tool to have while coaching.</p>

    • #7662

      Elizabeth Howze
      Participant

      Responding to Hope: I love the connections you brought up in regards to how the coaching process is personal. So often we can get so focused on our client that we fail to realize that the coaching role will shape, mold, and transform us as well! As we are journeying with our clients, we are on a journey as well and yes, it will bring to light our own weaknesses and vulnerabilities. Yikes!

      Responding to Latoya B.  You are spot on! As I was reading, I came to the realization that I too had been operating in the role of a coach and didn’t even know it! I just assumed that I was being a “good coworker” or a “good supervisor”. I don’t think I would have ever acknowledged myself as an effective coach until seeing it so clearly articulated in our readings.

    • #7663

      Lindsay Weston
      Participant

      <p class=”MsoNormal”><span style=”font-size: 12.0pt; line-height: 115%; font-family: ‘Georgia’,’serif’; color: #333333; background: white;”>What makes a good coach was very informative and listed many traits that describe good coaches. What stood out to me most was effective coaches know themselves, they are growing in self-awareness and they know what they do best. They are aware of their strengths and weaknesses but we have to be willing to face those weaknesses to see ourselves more clearly then we will be more effective in coaching others. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span>How some people learn self-awareness with counseling and coaching, Christians grow in self-awareness through the time we spend with God, prayer, reading, journaling or quiet reflection. Although a few of my <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span>personal experiences God has given me felt more like punishment <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span>and at times feedback from the people closest to me seemed harsh or negative, the purpose was for it to teach me about me. I find it interesting that a family member or friend will check you in an area that may need change and you may not realize you needed to make the change it until you get checked on it. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span>What’s exciting to me is that you are always growing in self-awareness.</span></p>

    • #7664

      Paquila Hudson
      Participant

      I agreed with the author that there is not a formula that can be taught to make a great coach.  The coach’s own unique personality and personal growth as guided by Holy Spirit plays a big part as well as their comittment to their client.  Attentive listening and resisting the temptation of making the session about the coach is key.  I believe that if a coach sees their client through the eyes of Christ and respects them as such it makes it easier earn the trust of the client.  I gathered that it’s important for a coach to know the type of clients that he/she wants to have.  Having a good rapport with a client forms a sense of unity between the client and coach which could make coaching more effective.  Coaching is a form of servant leadership involving encouraging and challenging people to fulfill their goals.  This style of leadership is much better received than the common dictatorial style.  People tend to be much more receptive when they are led with encouragement and usually end up being able to self-motivate.

    • #7665

      Lindsay Weston
      Participant

      Latasha GOOD FOR YOU! Sounds like whats a good coach was right on time for you! I am glad that you didn’t allow the negative feedback to discourage you. A good coach is many many traits and characteristics and I do not think there is a wrong way to answer because its ALL of those things.

    • #7666

      Paquila Hudson
      Participant

      Replying to Hope:  I am starting to understand  through my own recent experiences how that understanding my strengths and weaknesses helps me as I lead other people.  When I coach others being more aware of myself ensures that my own issues don’t start “bleeding” onto my clients during sessions.  Coaches have to be eager to learn and motivated to win.  This attitude should be contagious to their clients.  If a coach has a pessimistic or judgemental attitude it will likely discourage their clients and they probably won’t get pass one session.

    • #7667

      Paquila Hudson
      Participant

      Replying to Lindsay:   Praying and spending time in the word of God will bring a coach to self awareness really quickly.  The Word causes us to examine ourselves and the roots of some of our thinking patterns and attitudes.  When we can come to terms with our issues and see how God extends His grace to us it will be easier to extend the same grace while helping clients come to their own self realizations.  I believe this helps to create trust in the client – coach relationship and in turn make sessions more effective.

    • #7668

      Latasha Lunford
      Participant

      Replying to Lindsay: Your statement is so true, “<span style=”color: #313b3d; font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, sans-serif; font-size: 14px;”>Although a few of my personal experiences God has given me felt more like punishment and at times feedback from the people closest to me seemed harsh or negative, the purpose was for it to teach me about me.”</span>

      There are many times in which we don’t understand why God has allowed us to experience certain things. We think that he is punishing us. BUT you were right. He was actually teaching us a lesson in which he wanted us to learn from. God gives us tests, trials, and tribulations all of the time in many different variations. He wants us to develop all of the beatitudes of Christ. We are suppose to be like Job and praise him through the circumstance. Delight ourselves while we are going through and he will give us the desires of our heart.

       

    • #7669

      Latasha Lunford
      Participant

      Replying to Hope: I agree with your takeaway from this week’s reading! ” Great coaches are aware of their own core values and beliefs. Becoming a good coach to reveal your weakness will allow you to begin to see yourself more clearly.”

      Self awareness is vital to the coaching world. How can a coach teach someone else about self awareness if they have not identified the awareness within themselves first. It’s like the saying goes, Can the blind lead the blind? We will will not become successful if we can’t be the person who guides them into their truth.

    • #7672

      Monique L. Ross
      Participant

      What stood out the most to me in this chapter is the trust and relationship factor. Coaching requires one to be honest and aware within oneself in order to be effective as a coach. Being able to identify what is a good match for you as a coach is important. We cannot take on every assignment that presents itself as then it becomes work and not ministry. I say this because it was said that we must truly believe in the client. Believing in the client and his/her vision will speak mounds to the clients confidence in you to help guide them as they can feel your sincerity.  This will allow them to trust you and be honest with themselves and expressing it to you.  Making the right connection in coaching is key and expressing firm expectations of what you can and cannot offer as is coach will set the tone of the relationship. One thing that is a must is that the must not insert their own thoughts issues into the sessions making sure it doesn’t become about them.  Being able to deny self and being in tune with God will allow for us to be present for our clients and not let our inner man interfere with the work,

    • #7678

      Lisa
      Participant

      The one word that kept coming to my mind when I read  the chapter of what Makes a Good Coach is trust.  As I took notes on the chapter everything that was identified in making a good coach required trust. There must be a “Purpose to the Partnership”. I like how he furthered clarified what IS coaching and what coaching IS NOT. “Coaching is: collaborating, working together in conversating to further ones dreams/goals. Coaching is not: about me, my expertise, my advice…these things help me better understand how important it is to actively listen and engage only when it provides greater value than silence.  Additionally, as I read this chapter I realized that many of these techniques I do with my current staff at work.  I view our relationships as a partnership as opposed to a boss/employee. I find that when I give my employees ownership in making decisions within their area of responsibility they feel more valued and accomplished.  I also notice that they have greater trust in me because I allow them input and many times approve or use it.

    • #7679

      Lisa
      Participant

      Monique, I agree with you in that TRUST really stood out in the chapter.  Although I don’t recall seeing the word that often everything through the chapter exude the word TRUST.  However, as life has taught us it takes forever to build trust but a millisecond to lose it. With coaching there is a time limit in how long we will to work with the client.  I’m starting to think as I progress down the coaching path, I need to find creative but honest and genuine ways to establish trust quicker.

       

       

      <span style=”color: #313b3d; font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, sans-serif; font-size: 14px;”>What stood out the most to me in this chapter is the trust and relationship factor. Coaching requires one to be honest and aware within oneself in order to be effective as a coach. Being able to identify what is a good match for you as a coach is important. We cannot take on every assignment that presents itself as then it becomes work and not ministry. I say this because it was said that we must truly believe in the client. Believing in the client and his/her vision will speak mounds to the clients confidence in you to help guide them as they can feel your sincerity.  This will allow them to trust you and be honest with themselves and expressing it to you.  Making the right connection in coaching is key and expressing firm expectations of what you can and cannot offer as is coach will set the tone of the relationship. One thing that is a must is that the must not insert their own thoughts issues into the sessions making sure it doesn’t become about them.  Being able to deny self and being in tune with God will allow for us to be present for our clients and not let our inner man interfere with the work,</span>

    • #7680

      Lisa
      Participant

      Latoya, I too have and still do tell my employees what you tell yours.  We DO coach our employees IF we are leaders and just not managers/supervisors as you know there is a big difference.  Ironically, a little less than a year ago I was preparing to move to my new assignment here in Florida my team gave me a very emotional and touching going away party.  In one of the many speeches one of my employees did a speech in the form of a poem and he started out by saying “Lisa is not a boss, supervisor, manager or Chief….she is a Coach.  He went on to describe what a coach is and how I fit into each point he made.  It was incredible and by the time he finished nearly everyone was in tears to include him.  You know something my light bulb on the impact of that speech/poem did not come on until I read this assignment….wow!  Now I’m going to have to go look at the video and listen to it again. 🙂

       

      <span style=”color: #313b3d; font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, sans-serif; font-size: 14px;”>In this week’s reading  I learned  about being a good coach. I learned coaching is leadership. I am leader at my current employer and I never looked at it as coaching until reading this book. I always tell my employees that I am here to push them to their maximum potential personally and professionally. WOW!! I have been coaching for years and did not realize it. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span>In chapter 5 Collins talked about building relationships and how Important they are as you will have to gain trust of your clients as well build expectations and boundaries. It will also to prevent any miscommunication or understanding. I will work on forms for my clients to complete before first meeting and also outline what coaching is and what our sessions would look like. This chapter was very informative and provide some great tools and techniques to use as a business owner. Both chapters go hand in hand as being a good coach you have to build relationships with your clients. build trust to and respect and help the client to move from one point to on to the next. </span>

Viewing 31 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.